Phantom

Duchess Kittington von Meowselsworth II’s ship. The Phantom is a large ship in good repair that the Duchess inherited from her former owner who, in her will, adopted her as a daughter.

The Phantom is a great opera ship, crafted from old and strong wood and decorated on the outside with blues and purples. It is a massive ship, able to not only house a great performance within its finely decorated auditorium that sits in the centre of the ship, but also house the entire orchestra and all of the actors and actresses who were present in the halls to the opposite side of the auditorium. Towards the back of the ship, there is a dining hall. In many places hang not only classic French and Italian paintings, but some more modern pieces of industrial art, showing that this opera ship, during its golden age, was accepting of both classic and more modern artistry, not only in its d├ęcor, but in its repertoire of performances. One of the pieces is a portrait, of an old woman with the Duchess von Meowselsworth in her lap, eyes half lidded. Many of the windows are stained glass, likely engineered not to break in the sometimes hostile sky, as none of them seem damaged in the least. If this ship was truly damaged, then whoever restored it did a magnificent job.

Some of the rooms still have elements of personal flair complementing the classic style of the sturdy old wood ship, which might be a bit sad and hollow, as this is the only remaining ghost of the former crew. Some are decorated with classic weaponry, the room of the lead male actors, who just had a love for such thing. Perhaps it is a bit excessive, and to an art lover may seem cluttered next to the sights that are about. Some are just empty, people who have come and gone but never had the time to make it their own. Many are something in between, enough photos of loved ones to be a reminder of what has been lost, perhaps other personal items such as a music box here, or a chess set there, without painting such a detailed picture of the person who had lived there. The rooms are seemingly without end down the hall, though, and each is either just slightly or radically different. The beds, however, are all pretty well the same. Red covers over a comfortable mattress, usually for one or for two, depending on the person in question. The more space spent on the bed, however, the less space there is for other personal effects, such as dressers and chairs and end tables.

The halls are almost eerie in their emptiness, and with all the portraits that are about, it can be hard to shake the feeling that one is being watched. But the ship is called the Phantom, and perhaps there is a reason for that.

Phantom

Phantom

A World Without End pinvendor intrepidevil